Frequently Asked Questions


Playa Del Rey

Why are the changes on Culver Boulevard, Pershing Drive, and Jefferson Boulevard necessary?

For many years, street safety has been a serious concern for the residents of Playa del Rey. Between 2003 and 2016, 244 collisions resulted in injuries along Pershing Drive, Culver Boulevard, and Jefferson Boulevard, and eight people lost their lives. In early 2015, local residents engaged with Council District 11 and the Los Angeles Department of Transportation to address the danger posed to children, families, and the elderly by high-speed traffic in this area. 

What community outreach was conducted?  

Local residents concerned about the high number of collisions and injuries on Culver Boulevard, Pershing Drive, and Jefferson Boulevard, engaged Council District 11 and the Los Angeles Department of Transportation to discuss possible safety enhancements. After a series of community meetings, LADOT and Council District 11 held a public hearing on April 16, 2016 to discuss present enhancements that would make Playa del Rey's streets safer. On July 29 from 1 – 3 p.m. LADOT will host the first post-implementation project open house. Check the project website for updated open house information: playadelrey.lacity.org.

Can the lanes be returned to their prior configurations?

Due to the high number of collisions and injuries on the affected streets, a return to the previous lane configuration is not an option. However, the LADOT is monitoring traffic flow on local streets, including where Culver Boulevard and Pershing Drive meet another safety project on Vista Del Mar and small adjustments may be made as needed over time.

Will the reductions of lanes on Culver Boulevard, Pershing Drive, and Jefferson Boulevard cut traffic flow significantly?

The construction phase, involving changes to the lane configuration and over 2.3 miles of new lane striping, has led to traffic delays, especially at Nicholson Street and Culver Boulevard during the morning commute hours. LADOT is aware of the congestion issues and is monitoring developments carefully. Road changes of this kind typically require at least a month for people driving to get accustomed to the changes, and for future traffic flow patterns to emerge. The department will provide data to the public one month, three months and six months after the full completion of construction.  LADOT is also monitoring how the changes interact with an adjacent safety project on Vista DelMar, which connects to Culver and Pershing, in the downtown area of Playa del Rey. We will be looking to see if traffic signals, turn lanes, and other road configuration details are optimized or can be improved.


Vista Del Mar

Why are the changes on Vista Del Mar necessary?

The dangerous layout on Vista Del Mar has resulted in numerous people being hit by cars. Between 2003 and 2016, there were 210 crashes that seriously injured people, and five people were killed on the street.  In 2017, the City of Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) quickly took action to address the immediate safety issues on the street prior to the high-use summer months. The street was redesigned to prevent any further deaths on Vista Del Mar. Street safety is top priority under the city’s new Vision Zero Initiative, which uses data to prioritize street redesigns to prevent traffic deaths like those on Vista Del Mar.

What community outreach was conducted?  

Due to the compressed construction phase, intended to make the safety changes before the busy summer months at Dockweiler, LADOT needed to expedite the project implementation process. Commuters using the stretch felt surprised and negatively impacted by the current traffic changes. LADOT has taken steps to improve and expand community outreach and input, including collecting feedback along with traffic data that will inform any adjustments that need to be made. LADOT has consulted with the ADA on impacts, and will continue to work alongside the ADA to ensure impacts take into consideration individuals who may be hearing, visually, walking, or otherwise impaired.

Can the lanes be returned to their prior configurations?

The changes on Vista address acute safety hazards and legal issues, so a return to the old, unsafe configuration is not a realistic option. However, LADOT is monitoring how the changes interact with an adjacent safety project on Jefferson Boulevard and Culver Boulevard, which connect to Vista Del Mar in the downtown area of Playa Del Rey. We will be looking to see if traffic signals, turn lanes, and other road configuration details are optimized or can be improved.

Will the reductions of lanes on Vista Del Mar cut traffic flow significantly?

LADOT understands and is closely monitoring the traffic flow on Vista Del Mar that has raised concerns about short and long-term traffic impacts. The construction phase of the project caused significant delays and changes of this kind typically require at least a month for people driving to get accustomed to changes and for future traffic flow patterns to emerge. The changes on Vista Del Mar replace two lanes in each direction, with one lane in each direction, protected turn lanes, and new angled parking on the west side of the street.

It’s important to note that eliminating one lane of traffic does not mean that traffic gets twice as bad. One lane traffic, supported by turn lanes and better parking access, flows more smoothly and compactly, and can support much closer to the same capacity than might be assumed. However, it can take several weeks for this flow to balance out.